Exercise Programs for Hypertensive Individuals

Hypertensive Exercise Programs

Hypertensive Exercise Programs for Individuals

While drug therapy is traditionally considered to be the most practical form of treating high blood pressure, regular Hypertensive Exercise Programs has been found to be a valuable and safe adjunct therapy for many hypertensive individuals. In fact, a sound exercise program may serve as an effective non-drug alternative for some hypertensives.

In the past decade, substantial information has emerged concerning what constitutes an appropriate exercise prescription for an individual suffering from high blood pressure. Among the key factors that should be considered when designing a Hypertensive Exercise Programs for individual following facts should be considered:

Hypertensive Exercise Programs
Hypertensive Exercise Programs

Hypertensive Exercise Programs

Exercise Nature 

Non-weight-bearing or low-impact aerobic activities (e.g., walking, stair climbing, cycling, swimming, etc.) needs to emphasize since a significant portion of hypertensives, is obese or elderly. Both groups frequently suffer from a variety of lower-extremity orthopedic problems.

Exercise intensity  for Hypertensive Exercise Programs

Exercise intensity should keep at the lower end of the intensity range (i.e., 40% to 65% of VO2max or 50% to 75% of MHR). It should be noted that substantial evidence exists regarding the fact that high-intensity (greater than 70% of VO2max or 80% of MHR) aerobic exercise does not produce beneficial effects on blood pressure.

Exercise Frequency  for Hypertensive Exercise Programs

Hypertensive individuals should be encouraged to exercise at least four times per week — although exercising on a daily basis is preferable. A well-established effect of an acute bout of aerobic exercise is a temporary reduction in blood pressure, which can last for several hours.

Warm-up  for Hypertensive Exercise Programs

A prolonged warm-up period (more than five minutes) is advised to ensure that the hypertensive individual’s cardiovascular system prepares for the upcoming physical activity. An adequate warm-up reduces the hypertensive’s chances of experiencing a sharp and sudden rise in blood pressure.

Cool-down  for Hypertensive Exercise Programs

An extended cool-down period (more than five minutes) is recommended so that a gradual transition can be made from the conditioning activity back to the resting state. Cooling down helps to prevent dizziness, light-headedness, and fainting (all frequently associated with an abrupt cessation of exercise, especially in hypertensive individuals taking vasodilating agents).

Duration for Hypertensive Exercise Programs

Exercise duration should begin at 20 to 30 minutes of activity per session and progress to 30 to 60 minutes as adaptation occurs. Such a time frame for exercise duration should help to promote weight loss, which has been consistently associated with reductions in blood pressure.

RPE for Hypertensive Exercise Programs

Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) should be used to monitor exercise intensity for individuals taking antihypertensive medications (e.g., beta-blockers), which influence heart rate response. The recommended RPE range of these individuals would be 10 to 13 (light to somewhat hard).

These facts and figures are highly recommended for hypertensive exercise programs to produce healthy and active results.

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